Kobe Earthquake Case Study 2011 Movies

Kōbe earthquake of 1995, also called Great Hanshin earthquake, Japanese in full Hanshin-Awaji Daishinsai (“Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster”), (Jan. 17, 1995) large-scale earthquake in the Ōsaka-Kōbe (Hanshin) metropolitan area of western Japan that was among the strongest, deadliest, and costliest to ever strike that country.

The earthquake hit at 5:46 am on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 1995, in the southern part of Hyōgo prefecture, west-central Honshu. It lasted about 20 seconds and registered as a magnitude 6.9 (7.3 on the Richter scale). Its epicentre was the northern part of Awaji Island in the Inland Sea, 12.5 miles (20 km) off the coast of the port city of Kōbe; the quake’s focus was about 10 miles (16 km) below the earth’s surface. The Hanshin region (the name is derived from the characters used to write Ōsaka and Kōbe) is Japan’s second largest urban area, with more than 11 million inhabitants; with the earthquake’s epicentre located as close as it was to such a densely populated area, the effects were overwhelming. Its estimated death toll of 6,400 made it the worst earthquake to hit Japan since the Tokyo-Yokohama (Great Kantō) earthquake of 1923, which had killed more than 140,000. The Kōbe quake’s devastation included 40,000 injured, more than 300,000 homeless residents, and in excess of 240,000 damaged homes, with millions of homes in the region losing electric or water service. Kōbe was the hardest hit city with 4,571 fatalities, more than 14,000 injured, and more than 120,000 damaged structures, more than half of which were fully collapsed. Portions of the Hanshin Expressway linking Kōbe and Ōsaka also collapsed or were heavily damaged during the earthquake.

The earthquake was notable for exposing the vulnerability of the infrastructure. Authorities who had proclaimed the superior earthquake-resistance capabilities of Japanese construction were quickly proved wrong by the collapse of numerous supposedly earthquake-resistant buildings, rail lines, elevated highways, and port facilities in the Kōbe area. Although most of the buildings that had been constructed according to new building codes withstood the earthquake, many others, particularly older wood-frame houses, did not. The transportation network was completely paralyzed, and the inadequacy of national disaster preparedness was also exposed. The government was heavily criticized for its slow and ineffectual response, as well as its initial refusal to accept help from foreign countries.

In the aftermath of the Kōbe disaster, roads, bridges, and buildings were reinforced against another earthquake, and the national government revised its disaster response policies (its response to the 2004 quake in Niigata prefecture was much faster and more effective). An emergency transportation network was also devised, and evacuation centres and shelters were set up in Kōbe by the Hyōgo prefectural government.

After a quake hits, children are required to stay in school until an adult comes to collect them, in case their homes are damaged or their family members aren’t available to look after them.

As a result television footage from school and offices in Tokyo during Friday’s quake showed workers and students behaving with extraordinary calm and composure as buildings shook violently, sending files tumbling from desks and books from shelves.

After the quake crocodiles of children could be seen in Tokyo walking calmly to muster points wearing their protective helmets.

Many lessons were learned from the Kobe earthquake of 1995 that killed 6,400 people and forced a reassessment of the building regulations for both residential offices and transport infrastructure.

Damage to buildings in Tokyo was slight as a result of Japan’s stringent building regulations that ensure that skyscrapers sway in during a quake, but don’t collapse.

Buildings are made earthquake proof with the aid of deep foundation and massive shock absorbers that dampen seismic energy. Another method allows the base of a building to move semi-independently to its superstructure, reducing the shaking caused by a quake.

Photographs from the Kobe earthquake showed old buildings collapsed alongside modern buildings that withstood the quake, in some cases canted at an angle, but still standing, after the ground beneath them liquefied.

Immediately after an earthquake strikes in Japan, all television and radio stations switch immediately to official earthquake coverage which informs the public of risks, including tsunamis to enable people to retreat to higher ground or, on the coast, purpose-built tsunami defence bunkers.

For those trapped, all offices and many private houses in Japan have an earthquake emergency kits, including dry rations, drinking water, basic medical supplies. Offices and school also keep hard-hats and gloves for use in the event of a quake.

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