Foundation Biology 1640 Assignment No 1

CHAPTER ONE: 1640

HISTORY, MISSION, GENERAL ORGANIZATION, AND GOVERNANCE

January 2018


 

1640

COMMITTEE DIRECTORY

PREAMBLE: This section contains statements of the function and structure of each university-level standing committee. The names of persons appointed to serve on each such committee are published at the beginning of each academic year by the Committee on Committees, and copies of this publication are available from the Office of the Faculty Secretary (208-885-6151). This section, dating to the 1979 edition of the Handbook, has been frequently revised as necessitated by the changing mission or membership of existing committees or the deletion of obsolete committees or the addition of new ones.


Subsections
 

.02 Academic Hearing Board

.04 Academic Petitions Committee

.06 Administrative Hearing Board

.08 Admissions Committee

.10 Americans with Disabilities Act Advisory Committee

.12 Animal Care and Use Committee, Institutional

.46 Arts Committee

.14 Biosafety Committee, Institutional

.18 Borah Foundation Committee

.22 Campus Planning Advisory Committee

.24 Classified Position Appeal Board

.26 Commencement Committee

.28 Committee on Committees

.36 Dismissal Hearings Committee

.40 Facilities Scheduling Policy Committee

.41 Faculty and Staff Policy Group

.42 Faculty Affairs Committee

.43 Faculty Appeals Hearing Board

.44 Faculty Senate

.90 General Education Assessment Committee

.48 Graduate Council

.50 Grievance Committee for Staff Employees

.51 Grievance Committee for Student Employees

.53 Honors Program Committee

.54 Institutional Review Board

.55 Information Technology Committee

.56 Intellectual Property Committee

.60 Library Affairs Committee

.64 Officer Education Committee

.66 Parking Committee

.69 Promotions Review Committee

.34 Provost Council

.70 Publications Board

.71 Radiation Safety Committee

.72 Research Council

.74 Sabbatical Leave Evaluation Committee

.76 Safety and Loss-Control Committee

.77 Scientific Misconduct Committee

.80 Staff Council

.83 Student Conduct Board

.84 Student Financial Aid Committee

.86 Teacher Education Coordinating Committee

.87 Teaching and Advising Committee

.58 Ubuntu

.20 University Budget & Finance Committee

.89 University Committee for General Education

.91 University Curriculum Committee

.92 University Development Council

.94 University Multi-Campus Communications Committee

.95 University Security and Compliance Committee

 

1640.02

ACADEMIC HEARING BOARD (AHB)

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To act on requests for redress of academic grievances and to decide appeals from decisions made by college authorities.

a. Grievances may concern, but are not limited to, such matters as: (1) eligibility for advanced placement or credit by examination; (2) objectivity or fairness in making, administering, and evaluating class assignments; (3) maintenance of standards for conscientious performance of teaching duties; and (4) scheduling of classes, field trips, and examinations.

b. The AHB does not hear appeals concerning requirements or regulations of the College of Graduate Studies or the College of Law. Appeals from decisions of other college authorities are subject to the limitations specified in C-3.

A-2. To observe the effects of academic requirements, regulations, and policies, and to report its findings and recommendations to the Faculty Senate. [ed. 7-09]

B. STRUCTURE. Five faculty members, at least one of whom holds an administrative position in a college. In selecting a chair, a tenured faculty member will receive priority. [rev. 7-17]

C. PROCEDURES.

C-1. Generally the student who is dissatisfied with an institutional academic action should first request reconsideration by the appropriate academic authority. Normally, AHB should hear an appeal only after the student has exhausted the appellate procedures provided at the levels of the department and college. Nevertheless, AHB may grant a request for an earlier hearing if at least two of its members recommend an exception on the grounds that an immediate hearing is warranted.

C-2. When an appeal is to be heard, AHB summons the student concerned and a representative of the academic authority whose action is challenged. A UI student or employee who is summoned to a hearing has the same responsibility to respond as though directed by the president to do so.

C-3. AHB recommends reversal of a departmental or college decision as to the satisfaction or waiver of a requirement or regulation only when it finds that (a) regular procedures have not been followed, (b) the petitioner has been denied a fair hearing, or (c) the decision being appealed was discriminatory with respect to the petitioner.

C-4. Although AHB cannot change a grade or require that it be changed, it may order that the grade it considers appropriate also be recorded on the student’s academic records. (NOTE: Procedures for changing grades are outlined in the catalog.)

C-5. It is within the purview of the AHB to hear an appeal of a grade imposed by an instructor as a result of academic misconduct, e.g., cheating or plagiarism. Such a grade constitutes an evaluation and is not to be construed as a penalty. Penalties for academic misconduct are considered to be disciplinary in nature and must be imposed through the student judicial system. Appeals from penalties imposed through the student judicial system are directed to the Faculty Senate. [see 2200, 2300 II, 2400, and 2450.] [rev. 7-98, ed. 7-09]

C-6. AHB reports its decisions and recommendations to the student, instructor, departmental administrator, and dean concerned and to the registrar. The department, college, and registrar make such reports part of their permanent records for the student concerned.

C-7. AHB may devise additional procedures, consonant with the constitution of the university faculty [1520] and the “Statement of Student Rights” [2200], for the discharge of its functions.

C-8. Actions of the AHB may be appealed as stated in 2500.

 

1640.04

 ACADEMIC PETITIONS COMMITTEE (APC)

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To act on petitions for exceptions to the academic requirements and regulations printed in part 3 of the General Catalog and to the requirements of the SBOE core printed in part 2. APC is the body with original jurisdiction over such petitions. [rev. 7-05].

A-2. To observe the effects of university-level academic requirements, regulations, and policies and to report its findings and recommendations to the Faculty Senate. [ed. 7-09]

A-3.  This committee traditionally meets on Thursdays at 2:30 p.m. and during the summer. [add. 7-08]

B. STRUCTURE. Five faculty members, at least one from the Counseling and Testing Center and include two assistant or associate deans, and (w/o vote) the registrar or that officer’s designee. To assure a quorum alternates are appointed for the dean and faculty positions by the chair of the APC from a list of those who have previously served on the committee. [ed. 7-03, 7-06, rev. 7-08]

C. ASSUMPTIONS AND PROCEDURES.

C-1. APC must be careful not to establish the petition process as an alternative to being governed by the faculty’s legislated academic requirements. There are not two sets of requirements--one for those petitioning and another for those following the catalog.

C-2. All academic work undertaken should be accurately reflected in the student’s record. The faculty expects APC to ensure that the record is faithful to the actual experience (cosmetic adjustments or “corrections” are not sanctioned) and that the record is properly interpreted in relation to academic requirements.

C-3. The responsibility for complying with deadlines specified in the academic calendar belongs to the student.

C-4. The decisions of APC should be focused on the academic consideration involved that caused the student to petition, rather than on the consequences, either real or imagined, that may face the student.

C-5. Petitions are presented to APC by a representative of the student’s college.

C-6. APC reports its decisions to the registrar and to the student via his or her dean.

C-7. Procedures for appeals from decisions of this committee are as provided in 2500.

 

1640.06

 ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING BOARD (AdHB) 

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. The AdHB, acting for the Faculty Senate, hears and decides: [ed. 7-09]

a. Appeals by students and employees from administrative decisions in such matters as residence status for tuition purposes, granting of student financial aid, and assessment of fees or charges (except in connection with parking regulations, see 1640.66).

b. Disputes involving interpretation and application of policies concerning such matters as student records.

A-2. Disputes involving requests for accommodation for persons with disabilities will be handled under 3210.

A-3.  The AdHB is directed to observe the effects of university-level requirements, regulations, and policies and to report its findings and recommendations to the Faculty Senate.  [add. 4-13]

A-4. AdHB is empowered to call students and employees to hearings and any such person called has the same responsibility to respond as though summoned by the president. Decisions of AdHB are subject to review by the president and regents, and may be appealed to them when they consent to hear such appeals. [ren. 4-13]

A-5.  This committee meets during the summer.  [add. 7-10, ren. 4-13]

B. STRUCTURE. Four members of the faculty (including one from the College of Law), one staff member, one student and the following ex officio members, or their designees:  Registrar and Manager of Student Accounts. In selecting a chair, a tenured faculty member will receive priority. [rev. 7-06, 7-10, 7-17]

1640.08

ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE

 

A. FUNCTION. To act on applications for admission to UI in the cases of undergraduate applicants who do not meet minimum requirements for admission but who request a review (the applicant must submit additional material that reflects real promise of success in a college-level curriculum). The Admissions Committee also hears appeals from disenrollment when that disenrollment is the result of the presentation of incomplete or false information on initial application as an undergraduate at UI. Decisions of this committee may be appealed as stated in 2500. (Similar applications for admission to the College of Graduate Studies are acted on by the Graduate Council, and its decisions may be appealed as stated in 2500; those for admission to the College of Law are acted on by that college’s Committee on Admissions, and its decisions may be appealed, in order, to the full faculty of the college and, when they consent to hear the appeal, to the president of the university and the regents.) [ed. 7-00]

    A-1. This committee traditionally meets during the summer. [add. 7-08]

B. STRUCTURE. Three members of the faculty, director of counseling and testing center or designee, chair of Ubuntu or designee, and the following without vote: director of admissions (or designee), and a Student Support Services designee. To assure a quorum alternates for the faculty positions are appointed by the chair of the Admissions Committee from a list of those who have previously served on the Committee. [rev. 7-97, 7-06, 7-08 ed. 7-05, 4-12]

 

1640.10

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE

[Created 2012, see Ubuntu FSH 1640.58]

 

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To advise the  Director of Human Rights, Access and Inclusion on all matters relating to disability, including universal access and design of university facilities, websites, and programming; accommodation of students, faculty and staff with disabilities; full compliance with the Americans With Disabilities Act as amended, Idaho Human Rights Act, Rehabilitation Act of 1974, and Fair Housing Act; and to discharge such other functions as may be assigned by the Faculty Senate or by the president or the president’s designee.

A-2.To fulfill the major faculty responsibility for monitoring and advancing UI’s commitment to ensuring that its facilities, programs, activities and services are accessible to all persons with learning, sensory, physical and other disabilities, and to serve the needs of these members of the university community. The committee works closely with administrative officers in identifying and ensuring compliance with applicable laws, regulations and best practices, as well as regents’ policy.

A-3.To submit periodic reports on its activities to the Director of Human Rights, Access and Inclusion, who will distribute them to the Faculty Senate along with recommendations for appropriate program or policy changes.

B. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP. Three (one from the library, one academic administrator, and the third should have experience and/or possess knowledge of persons with disabilities) all of whom are selected by the Committee on Committees, ITS Director (or designee), Facilities Director (or designee), Executive Director for Human Resources (or designee), Director of Disability Support Services, Director of Housing, Director of Human Rights, Access and Inclusion (who also serves on Ubuntu), two staff members, two students (undergraduate and graduate), and the following without vote: Parking and Transportation Services, Center on Disabilities and Human Development, Public Safety & Security (or designee), and Office of General Counsel. [ed. 8-12]

 

1640.12

INSTITUTIONAL ANIMAL CARE AND USE COMMITTEE (IACUC)

(See also APM 45.01) [ed.12-13]

A. FUNCTION. To perform the functions of the IACUC as defined in APM 45.01. [ed. 7-06, rev. 7-10].

 

B. STRUCTURE. [rewritten 7-10]

B-1. Members are appointed to three year terms by the Institutional Official (IO) who is the VP for Research and Economic Development. To provide the necessary expertise and continuity members may serve successive terms with reappointment by the IO.  

B-2.  The committee is composed of not less than seven voting members including the Campus Veterinarian; the Manager of the Laboratory Animal Research Facility; a public member who is not employed by the UI, is not a laboratory animal user, is not an immediate family member of an individual affiliated with the UI, and is not a practicing scientist experienced in research involving animals; one member of the faculty or staff with responsibilities involving the utilization of animals in teaching or research from each of the following - the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Natural Resources, the College of Science, and one member at large. The public member/non-scientist position may be fulfilled by two individuals at the discretion of the IO. (See Monitoring The Care and Use of Animals: Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee on the National Academies of Science website.)  

B-3.  Alternates that meet the criteria for each of the specified positions may be appointed by the IO.  

B-4.  The Chief Research Compliance Officer serves as a standing member without vote.  

B-5.  The IO may remove and replace a committee member at any time when the IO has determined that the member is unwilling or unable to perform committee member functions.

1640.14

INSTITUTIONAL BIOSAFETY COMMITTEE (IBC)

[rewritten 7-10]

 

A. FUNCTION. On behalf of the University, the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) is responsible for:

A-1.  Reviewing and approving potentially biohazardous material research, including infectious agents (humans, plants, animals) or biological agents with potential harm to the environment, Select Agent and Toxins and recombinant DNA activities conducted at or sponsored by the institution for compliance with governmental agencies:  Select Agent Regulations, the NIH Guidelines, (NIH) and alignment with best practices as provided in the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, (BMBL) and other appropriate best practices. (Links to the governmental agencies are available at the Office of Research Assurances or IBC websites).  This review shall include:  (i) independent assessment of the containment levels appropriate for the proposed research; (ii) assessment of the facilities, procedures, practices, and training and expertise of personnel involved in research. As appropriate consultants may be utilized to assist the IBC. (NIH section IV-B-2-b-1 and University Biosafety Policy)  

 

A-2.  Notifying the Principal Investigator of the results of the IBC’s review and approval. (NIH section IV-B-2-b-2)  

 

A-3.  Lowering containment levels for certain experiments as specified in NIH section III-D-2-a, Experiments in which DNA from Risk Group 2, Risk Group 3, Risk Group 4, or restricted agents cloned into nonpathogenic prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic host-vector systems. (NIH section IV-B-2-b-3)  

 

A-4.  Setting containment levels as specified in NIH Sections III-D-4-b, Experiments Involving Whole Animals, and III-D-5, Experiments Involving Whole Plants. (NIH section IV-B-2-b-4)  

 

A-5.  Periodically reviewing recombinant DNA research and potentially infectious material research conducted at the institution to ensure compliance with the NIH Guidelines and BMBL best practices.  These reviews occur every three years. (NIH section IV-B-2-b-5)  

 

A-6.  Adopting emergency plans covering accidental spills and personnel contamination resulting from potentially infectious material and recombinant DNA research. (NIH section IV-B-2-b-6)

 

The IBC also serves as an advisory body to the Vice President for biohazardous research activities.

 

B. STRUCTURE. The IBC is a faculty chaired committee. In accordance with NIH Guidelines, the IBC must be comprised of no fewer than five members so selected that they collectively have experience and expertise in recombinant DNA technology and the capability to assess the safety of recombinant DNA research and to identify any potential risk to public health or the environment.  These members are nominated by the Vice President for Research and Economic Development. Three members of the committee serve as standing members of the committee as part of their job role: 1.) The Biosafety Officer, 2.) The Chief Research Compliance Officer and 3.) The Campus Veterinarian.  At least two members shall not be affiliated with the University (apart from their membership on the IBC) and represent the interest of the surrounding community with respect to health and protection of the environment.  The IBC shall include at least one individual with expertise in plant, plant pathogen, or plant pest containment principles when experiments utilizing Appendix P of the NIH Guidelines, Physical and Biological Containment for Recombinant DNA Research Involving Plants, require prior approval by the IBC.  The IBC shall include at least one scientist with expertise in animal containment principles when experiments utilizing Appendix Q of the NIH Guidelines, Physical and Biological Containment for Recombinant DNA Research Involving Animals, require IBC prior approval.  When the institution conducts recombinant DNA research at BL3, BL4, or Large Scale (greater than 10 liters), a Biosafety Officer is mandatory and shall be a member of the IBC.  In order to ensure the competence necessary to review and approve research protocols, every effort is made to ensure that the committee also includes expertise in infectious materials, biological safety, physical containment, a person knowledgeable in institutional commitments and policies, applicable law, standards of professional conduct and practice, and a member of the laboratory technical staff. When changes in NIH guidelines require change in committee structure, such changes will become effective at the time required by federal law, (NIH Section IV-B-2-a). To provide the necessary expertise and continuity of operation, members may serve consecutive three-year terms.

 

The Responsible Official (RO) who is the VP for Research and Economic Development may remove and replace a committee member at any time when the RO has determined that the member is unwilling or unable to perform committee member functions.

 1640.18

BORAH FOUNDATION COMMITTEE

A. FUNCTION. To outline and execute a continuing program to achieve the objectives of the foundation established at UI in memory of United States Senator William E. Borah. In accordance with those objectives, the Borah Foundation Committee will sponsor programs and projects focusing on understanding the causes of war and the conditions that contribute to peace. [rev. 9-02]

B. STRUCTURE. Six faculty members, two staff, four students, and (without vote) the associate director of the Martin Institute for Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution. This committee requires a heavy time commitment; as such, elected members will serve two year terms.  The Borah Foundation Committee meets weekly and elects its own chair. The Borah Foundation Committee members serve from April 1st of the year of appointment. [rev. 7-97, 7-05, 7-06, 4-11, 9-13]

 

1640.20

UNIVERSITY BUDGET AND FINANCE COMMITTEE

[created January 2005; replacing previous Institutional Planning and Budget Advisory Committee]

A. FUNCTION. The function of the University Budget and Finance Committee is

A-1. To advise the president, provost and the vice president for finance on matters pertaining to operating and capital budgets. The Committee will periodically review policy matters regarding the use of state appropriated funds, university expenditures (e.g., salaries, benefits, operating costs, capital outlays, etc.), operating and strategic reserves, long and short term capital plans, and deferred maintenance plans. [ed. 7-06, rev. 2-11, 7-15]

A-2. To be involved strategically in the university budget process. The Committee may help define the budget process and goals, and participate in university budget hearings and meetings. [rev. 7-15]

A-3. To initiate and/or respond to the study of budget and financial policies and issues. [rev. & ren. 7-15]

A-4. To provide periodic reports to Faculty Senate and Staff Council on matters pertaining to university finances and budgets. [ed. 7-09, 7-17, ren. 7-15]

B. AGENDA. The agenda of each meeting will be set by the Chair of the committee in collaboration with the vice president for finance and/or the provost. The vice president for finance is the point of contact for the committee and is responsible for notifying the committee of relevant meetings dealing with university finances and budgets. The Senator on the Budget and Finance Committee is responsible for reporting activities of the committee to the Senate.  [ed. 7-06, rev. 2-11, 7-15, 7-17]  

C. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP. The committee is composed of 19 voting members, plus 3 nonvoting members. The voting members will consist of ten faculty selected by Committee on Committees (preferably, one faculty member from each academic college and one representative from faculty-at-large), and one Senator elected from the Faculty Senate; five staff, (one from each vice presidential area nominated by Staff Council); and three students (selected by the Committee on Committees from nominations provided by the Associated Students of the University of Idaho, Graduate & Professional Student Association and the Student Bar Association). Ex Officio (w/o vote) members include: Provost and Executive Vice President, Vice President for Finance, and Budget Office representative. [rev. 2-11, 7-15, 7-16, 7-17]  

The committee’s chair will be selected by the Committee on Committees from one of the faculty members.   [ed. 7-09, rev. 2-11, 7-16, 7-17]

1640.22

CAMPUS PLANNING ADVISORY COMMITTEE

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To advise the Faculty Senate and the president concerning campus planning, including such areas as the following: [ed. 7-09]

a. To recommend projects that affect the campus environment and to review such projects that originate outside of the committee.

b. To encourage optimal use of UI’s human and physical resources in the planning of campus development.

c. To consider faculty and staff views concerning interrelationships between academic and support programs and their environment.

d. To be concerned with both short-term and long-term projects and with their immediate and future implications.

e. To be concerned with the coordination of campus and community planning: keeping informed on development planning in the community, taking such planning into consideration in campus planning, and informing community planners of projected campus developments.

A-2. To present annually to the Faculty Senate and the president a report on the campus plan. Because of the responsibility of the vice president for infrastructure for overseeing facility planning and maintenance [see 1420 B-1], this committee regularly reports to the president through that vice president. [ed. 7-09, 1-17]

B. STRUCTURE. Five faculty members, two of whom are elected by and from Faculty Senate. The committee's chair will be selected from one of these five.  The other members of the committee will be the Vice President for Infrastructure (or designee), the Assistant Vice President for Facilities, the CIO of Information Technology, one staff member, and the Coordinator of Disabled-Student Services (or designee). [rev. 7-99, 7-06, 7-08, 7-10, ed. 7-04, 7-09, 9-15, 1-17]

 

1640.24

CLASSIFIED POSITION APPEAL BOARD (CPAB)

A. FUNCTION. To hear, on referral from the vice president for finance and administration, appeals from decisions of Human Resources (HR) regarding position classifications; to make recommendations to the vice president as to disposition of such appeals; and to advise the vice president on problems and procedures concerning position classification. [ed. 7-06]

B. STRUCTURE. Four members of the classified staff, at least one of whom holds a supervisory position; two faculty members, each of whom holds or has held an administrative position at UI; and, without vote, the director of employment services. The staff members are nominated by the Staff Affairs Committee and the faculty members are nominated by the Committee on Committees. Members are appointed by the president and serve for three years, with one-third taking office each year. The board elects its own chair. [ed. 7-05]

C. PROCEDURES.

C-1. Appeals of classification decisions made by HR are submitted directly to the vice president for finance. A “Notice of Appeal” form must be filed with the vice president, with a copy to the CPAB chair, within 30 days of the notification to the supervisor by HR of its decision. [ed. 7-06, 9-15]

C-2. The vice president will notify the director of employment services that a “Notice of Appeal” form has been received and that an advisory opinion is being requested from the CPAB. The vice president will request that HR supply seven copies of available documentation to the CPAB chair within 10 working days. CPAB will schedule a hearing at the earliest time convenient for all parties. [ed. 7-06]

C-3. The director of employment services, the employee, and his or her supervisor will be notified of the date, time, and place of the hearing. The format is as follows: The analyst from HR will present the basis for the decision that was made; the employee or supervisor, or both, will present reasons for disagreement; the human resources analyst will be given time for closing comments as will the employee and the supervisor. The board may ask questions for further clarification after the presentation. The board will then meet in closed session for deliberation. [ed. 7-06]

C-4. The CPAB will forward its recommendation to the vice president. The vice president will notify the employee, the employee’s supervisor, the director of employment services, and the CPAB chair of the final decision. [ed. 7-06]

1640.26

COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE [rev. 7-98]

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To recommend policies applicable to the annual commencement exercises, to provide the president with a list of recommended speakers for the general ceremony, to consider and communicate the concerns of faculty members and colleges with regard to the entire commencement proceedings, and to provide advice to the registrar or president on any other business that pertains to the academic aspects of commencement. [See also 4980.] [ren. 7-98]

A-2. To screen nominations for honorary degrees. [See Section 4930.] [add. 7-98, ed. 7-00, 7-04]

A-3. To act for the faculty in recommending candidates for honorary degrees to the president. [See Section 4910.]  [add. 7-98]

A-4. To review the guidelines and procedures concerning the awarding of honorary degrees and to recommend changes to the Faculty Senate. [add. 7-98, ed. 7-09]

B. STRUCTURE. Five faculty members (one of whom serves as chair), one honors student (nominated by ASUI in consultation with the director of the University Honors Program), and the registrar. The chair of this committee also serves as an ex-officio member of the administrative committee charged with production of the commencement activities. [rev. 7-98]

 

1640.28

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To appoint members to and fill vacancies on all university-level faculty standing committees, subject to confirmation by the Faculty Senate. To ensure full membership when committees begin meeting each fall, authority is given to the Faculty Secretary, Faculty Senate Chair and Vice Chair (aka Committee on Committees Chair) to fill vacancies as they arise over the summer and early fall semester, subject to confirmation by the Committee on Committees and Faculty Senate. [ed. 7-09, rev. 1-15]

A-2. To conduct a continuing study of UI’s committee structure and of the function and structure of individual standing committees, and to make recommendations to the Faculty Senate. [ed. 7-09]

B. STRUCTURE. Six faculty members, vice chair of the Faculty Senate (chair), Faculty Secretary (w/o vote) and the following or their designees: provost and executive vice president and ASUI president. [rev. 7-05, ed. 7-06, 7-09]

1640.34

PROVOST COUNCIL

[ed. 7-06]

 

A. FUNCTION. [See also 1420 D.] To advise the provost and provide a communication forum for the following purposes:

A-1. Implementing academic policies and procedures.

A-2. Operating faculty personnel policies.

A-3. Evaluating the effectiveness of academic-management procedures.

A-4. Developing academic budgetary priorities.

A-5. Implementing academic budgetary procedures.

B. STRUCTURE. Provost (chair), vice provosts for academic affairs and student affairs, vice president for research and economic development, dean of graduate studies, WWAMI director, library dean, center leadership and academic deans. [rev. 7-03, 7-06, 1-07, ed. 9-10]

 

1640.35

DISABILITY AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

[Combined with Affirmative Action in July 2006]

 

1640.36

DISMISSAL HEARINGS COMMITTEES

[This section was removed from FSH 3910 D-3.b. and placed here in July 2008]

A. FUNCTION.  This committee will conduct a hearing at the request of a faculty member who has been terminated to determine whether their termination was properly based on the grounds stated (see FSH 3910 D-3 and 3920 D.)

 

B. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP:  The DHC is composed of four faculty members and one administrator at the departmental level or above, six faculty members and three administrators as alternates. Committee members, including alternates, are chosen on the basis of their objectivity and competence and the high regard in which they are held in the UI community. In appointing members the Committee on Committees should attempt to reflect the diversity of the UI faculty. Due to the possibility a case may be appealed to the Faculty Appeals Hearing Board care should be taken in appointing members to both Faculty Appeals Hearing Board and Dismissal Hearings Committee.  The term of membership is three years. [rev. 1-09, 4-11]

 

C. SELECTION: The faculty member requesting a hearing has the right to substitute up to two members appointed with two others from the alternate list. The provost also has the right to substitute two members appointed with two others from the alternate list. If as a result of substitutions and conflicts of interest there are an insufficient number of faculty members or administrators on the alternate list, the Committee on Committees will be asked to appoint more members to the alternate list as needed.  Once the panel for an individual hearing has been determined, it will meet at the direction of the chair of the Dismissal Hearings Committee and elect its own panel chair. In selecting a chair, a tenured faculty member will receive priority. [rev. 1-09, 7-17]

C-1. Panel Chair’s Role:  Once a panel chair has been selected, he/she will request a meeting with the Faculty Secretary at their earliest opportunity to discuss and review process. The panel chair may request assistance from the Faculty Secretary, Ombuds or General Counsel’s office throughout the hearing. [add. 7-15]  

C-2. Observers:  Both parties may have an advisor or counsel at the hearing. [add. 7-15]

1640.40

FACILITIES SCHEDULING POLICY COMMITTEE

[Substantially revised in 2007. See also APM 35.35]

 

A. FUNCTION.

A-1: To develop, implement, and manage scheduling policies and procedures to ensure the impartial and principled use of university facilities, both buildings and grounds, consistent with accreditation standards.

 

A-2: To advise the president or the president’s designee on the operational use of UI facilities and to advise him/her and the vice president for finance concerning appropriate fees to charge [ed. 9-15].

 

A-3: To manage the impact of events, programs, and multiple events on daily University operations.

 

A-4: To ensure the effective resolution of scheduling conflicts.

 

A-5: To communicate information to the campus and community concerning facility use, policy, and procedures.

 

B. STRUCTURE. Registrar (co-chair), assistant vice president for auxiliary services (co-chair), vice provost for academic affairs, dean of students, assistant vice president for facilities, faculty secretary,  two faculty members, the chair of the Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, the chair of Lionel Hampton School of Music, the chair of Theatre Arts and Film, the risk management officer, the director of Commons and Union/Campus Recreation, the director of Conference Services,  the associate registrar, the manager of KIBBIE/Memorial Gym/Pool Center, the associate director of Athletics, the facilities planner, two ASUI representatives (one from the Student Recreation Center Board and one from the Student Union-Commons Board).

 

C.  CONTEXT:  UI Facilities are used by multiple programs, including: academic programs, intercollegiate athletics, campus recreation programs, and by multiple constituencies including students, faculty, staff, retirees, alumni, and visitors.  As demand for university facilities increases, there will be increasing potential for scheduling and scheduling policy conflicts. Policies and procedures for ensuring the impartial and principled resolution of those scheduling conflicts will be critical.

 

D.  MAJOR OBJECTIVES: 

 

D-1.  To analyze the issues associated with scheduling and resolving facilities scheduling conflicts.

 

D-2.  To develop effective policies and procedures for University facility use that:

 

a.  support the general educational mission of the University;

b.  maximize opportunity to provide a revenue stream from facilities when such uses do not conflict with the mission of the University;

c.  minimize risk of loss associated with the goals, finances, operations, compliance;

d.  provide for the impartial, principled scheduling of facilities and for resolving scheduling conflicts, while ensuring both efficient use of the facilities and an efficient scheduling process.

 

D-3.  To develop systematic assessment methods and procedures (when needed) which demonstrate the effectiveness and impartiality of the scheduling process.

 

D-4.  To provide those with programs or activities in these facilities with an on-going opportunity for representative participation in the scheduling process.

 

1640.41

FACULTY AND STAFF POLICY GROUP (FSPG)

[created July 2017]

A. FUNCTION.  

 

A-1. To review non-academic policies and procedures (other than minor amendments, see FSH 1460 B-2) that affect both faculty and staff and that reside in the Faculty-Staff Handbook and/or Administrative Procedures Manual.  

 

A-2. To ensure that both Faculty Affairs and Staff Council are informed, the chair of FSPG will communicate regularly with the chairs of Faculty Affairs and Staff Leadership.  

 

A-3. To address and possibly resolve any perceived problems before forwarding proposed policies and procedures to Faculty Senate, the committee is encouraged to seek assistance from, or request meetings with the policy sponsor (see FSH 1460 B-6), general counsel, or others as necessary.  

 

B. STRUCTURE. Three faculty, three staff, and the Faculty Secretary/Policy Coordinator, or his/her designee.  A broad representation of faculty and staff across the university is expected and who are seen as leaders among their peers. A current member of Faculty Affairs and Staff Council is desirable, if possible. The chair of this committee will be the Faculty Secretary/Policy Coordinator (w/o vote). [rev. 1-18]

 

1640.42
FACULTY AFFAIRS COMMITTEE (FAC)

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To conduct a continuing study of salaries, professional problems, welfare, retirement options and benefits (including 403b plans), and working conditions of faculty members.

A-2. To call the attention of the Faculty Senate or the president, as appropriate, to matters concerning faculty affairs in any college or other unit that the committee believes should be of concern. [ed. 7-09]

A-3. To serve as a point of first contact involving questions of interpretation and application of policies affecting the welfare of faculty members such as promotion and tenure. [rev. 7-17]

B. STRUCTURE. Nine faculty members, not more than two of whom are departmental administrators (administrators above the departmental level are not eligible for membership on this committee). [rev. 7-08]

 

1640.43

FACULTY APPEALS HEARING BOARD

[This section was removed from FSH 3840 C & D and placed here in July 2008]

 

A. FUNCTION.  This board will conduct a hearing at the request of a faculty member who wishes to appeal an institutional decision under FSH 3840 A.  In each case referred to it, the board has the following responsibilities: [ed. 7-12]

 

A-1. To review all documentary evidence submitted by the parties prior to the hearing and all evidence submitted by the parties at the hearing. The board may require the parties to submit evidence deemed relevant by the board.

 

A-2. To determine whether there has been any (1) failure to comply with prescribed procedures, (2) application of inappropriate considerations, (3) abuse of discretion, or (4) abuse of the appellant’s academic rights and privileges.

 

A-3. To make recommendations to the president.

 

B.  STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP: Five faculty members, one of whom is a departmental administrator, are principal members. In addition, five other faculty members, two other departmental administrators, and three off-campus faculty members are appointed as alternate members of the board. In appointing members, including alternates, the Committee on Committees must ensure that the majority of the members are tenured and each of them have been employed at the UI for longer than two years.  Since a case for dismissal is appealable to the Faculty Appeals Hearing Board, care should be taken in appointing members to both Faculty Appeals Hearing Board and Dismissal Hearings Committee. The term of membership is three years, with initial terms staggered to form a rotation pattern. The off-campus alternates will serve, in place of principal faculty members chosen by lot, when an appeal by an off-campus faculty member is to be heard. The other alternate members will serve, as appropriate, when a principal member is deemed to have a conflict of interest. Once the panel for an individual hearing has been determined, it will meet at the direction of the chair of the Faculty Appeals Hearing Board and elect its own panel chair. In selecting a chair, a tenured faculty member will receive priority. [rev. 7-99, 1-09, 4-11, 7-17] 

B-1. Panel Chair’s Role:  Once a panel chair has been selected, he/she will request a meeting with the Faculty Secretary at their earliest opportunity to discuss and review process. The panel chair may request assistance from the Faculty Secretary, Ombuds, or General Counsel’s office throughout the hearing. [add. 7-15]  

B-2. Observers:  Both parties may have an advisor or counsel at the hearing. [add. 7-15] 

C.SPECIALCONSIDERATION: Faculty members serving on the Faculty Appeals Hearing Board (FAHB) should take careful note of the following additional considerations and conditions for service: 1) appeals usually occur following tenure, promotion, and salary decisions in the middle of the Spring semester, 2) appeal hearings usually require a 2-4 hour time block which will require meeting on a weekday evening or Saturday to accommodate the schedules of all of the parties involved in a hearing, and 3) the term of office of a member of the FAHB ends when the last active case final report is submitted. Faculty members not willing to abide by these conditions should not apply for service on the Faculty Appeals Hearing Board. [add. 7-02]

 

1640.44

FACULTY SENATE

[See 1520 V and 1580 for the function and structure of this senate.] [ed. 7-09]

1640.46

ARTS COMMITTEE

[rev. 7-99, extensively revised 7-08]

A. FUNCTION:

A-1. To advise the university administration regarding the management of the university arts, including, but not limited to: acquisition, deaccession, maintenance, and display of works of visual and performing art at the University of Idaho.

 

A-2 To serve in an advisory capacity for future needs and developments regarding the arts, including, but not limited to: expenditures, inclusion of the arts in new construction, fundraising, and the direction of the arts on campus.

 

A-3 To serve as a liaison on arts issues between colleges, departments, faculty, staff, student body, local community and the university administration.

 

A-4 To advocate for the arts through endeavors that advance arts education on campus and community outreach and enrichment in the effort of increasing the University of Idaho's reputation as a leading cultural center in the Northwest.

 

B. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP. The committee is composed of eight voting members consisting of five faculty members representing at least four units, one staff member, two students (including a representative from the ASUI Fine Arts Committee when possible), and four ex-officio (non-voting) members to include one administrator designated by the president, a representative of the Laboratory of Anthropology, a representative from Facilities Management, and the Moscow Arts Commission Art Director, or designee.

1640.47

FISCAL EMERGENCY COMMITTEE

[Removed 7/05 no longer exists.]

 

1640.48

GRADUATE COUNCIL

[See 1700 V for the function and structure of this council.]

1640.50

GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE FOR STAFF EMPLOYEES

[See 3860 for the function and structure of this committee.]

 

1640.51

GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE FOR STUDENT EMPLOYEES

[See 3880 for the function and structure of this committee.]

1640.53

HONORS PROGRAM COMMITTEE

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To recommend policies for the University Honors Program, including admission requirements.

A-2. To act on changes in the program.

A-3. To act on petitions for exceptions to the requirements of the program. (The committee’s actions on petitions may be appealed as stated in 2500.)

B. STRUCTURE. Six faculty members to represent a broad spectrum of the UI community, an academic dean from one of the six colleges representing the honors curriculum (college representation to rotate on an annual basis), President of the Honors Student Advisory Board or designee, and (w/o vote) director of the University Honors Program (UHP), program advisor of the UHP (staff). The latter serves as secretary. One of the six appointed faculty members serves as chair. [rev. 7-97, 7-03, 7-05, 7-06, 3-14, ed. 7-98, 7-10]

1640.54

INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD

[Formerly Human Assurances Committee, rev. 1-09, rewritten 7-10]

 

A. FUNCTION. The federal government requires the University to designate an Institutional Review Board (IRB) to ensure that human participant research conducted under the auspices of the University meets federal requirements. Under the approved federal-wide assurance (FWA00005639) for the University, the IRB shall apply the regulations set forth by HHS (www.hhs.gov) at 45 CFR 46 to all human participant research, regardless of funding source, and shall be guided by the ethical principles set forth in The Belmont Report: Ethical Principles and Guidelines for the Protection of Human Subjects of Research of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects. The IRB shall also apply the human participant research regulations established by the Food and Drug Administration for clinical investigations involving drugs, biologics, medical devices, and other test articles. (21 CFR 50; 56; 312, and 812). The IRB shall act in conformance with other federal laws and regulations germane to human participant research and with state and local law that serves to elucidate and supplement federal regulations for human subject research. [See FSH 5200.]

A-1.  Research that has been approved by the IRB may be subject to further review and approval or disapproval by UI officials. However, university officials may not approve research that has not been approved by the IRB. (45 CFR 46.112)

The committee also serves as an advisory body to the VP for Research and Economic Development for Human Subjects/Participants Research Matters.  

B. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP.

B-1.  The IRB is a faculty-chaired committee.  

B-2.  It shall have at least five members, with varying backgrounds to promote complete and adequate review of research activities commonly conducted at the University of Idaho [45 CFR 46.107(a)].  

B-3.  The position of Chief Research Compliance Officer serves in the capacity of a non-voting standing committee member to assist in representing institutional commitments and regulations, [45 CFR 46.107(a)].  

B-4.  The IRB shall include one member whose primary concerns are in scientific areas and one member whose main concerns are in nonscientific areas [45 CFR 46.107(c)].  

B-5.  The IRB shall include one member who is not otherwise affiliated with the institution and who is not part of the immediate family of a person who is affiliated with the institution [45 CFR 46.107(d)].

B-6.  The IRB may, in its discretion, invite individuals with competence in special areas to assist in the review of issues which require expertise beyond or in addition to that available on the IRB.  These individuals may not vote with the IRB [45 CFR 46.107(f)].  

B-7.  The Signatory Official, who is the VP for Research and Economic Development may remove and replace a committee member at any time. If and when he/she determines that the member is unwilling or unable to carry out committee functions. 

 

1640.55

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE

[created 7-00, replacing Instructional Media Services Advisory and University Computing Advisory Committees]

A. FUNCTION. To advise and recommend university policies regarding the planning, implementation, and maintenance of information technology in the areas of teaching, research, outreach, and management.

A-1. To make recommendations to the Faculty Senate, the president, the provost, and other appropriate administrators concerning policies and procedures affecting university-wide information technology. [ed. 7-09]

A-2. To solicit recommendations from the faculty, staff, students, and administration concerning present and proposed policies and procedures related to university-wide information technology.

A-3. To review, in an advisory capacity, short-term and long-term plans related to university-wide technology.

A-4. This committee traditionally meets on Mondays at 3:30 p.m. [add. 7-08]

B. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP. Six faculty members broadly representative of disciplines in the university including one from the library, the Vice-President for Research or designee (w/o vote), the Vice President for Infrastructure, or designee (w/o vote), the Registrar, or designee (w/o vote), the Director of the Center for Teaching Innovation, or designee, a representative of the off-campus faculty, the student chair of the Student Computing Advisory Committee, or designee. The voting members of the committee (including the committee chair but excluding the student member) are selected by the Committee on Committees, giving special attention to appointing faculty members who are active in and have a great interest in the general area of information technology and its application to teaching, research, outreach, and management. [ed. 7-05, 9-15, rev. 7-06] 

1640.56

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY COMMITTEE

A. FUNCTION.

A-1. To consider, investigate, and make recommendations toward resolution of disputes concerning (1) ownership of maskworks and copyrightable and patentable materials, and (2) allegations of unauthorized use of copyright infringement of UI sponsored materials.

A-2. To present annually to the Faculty Senate and the president a report on any problems regarding intellectual property at UI and to make recommendations. [ed. 7-09]

B. STRUCTURE AND MEMBERSHIP. The committee consists of five faculty members, one of whom is a departmental administrator, and at least a majority of whom are from disciplines which historically have given rise to substantial numbers of copyrights, maskworks, and patents. In addition, two faculty members are appointed as alternates from a list of those who have previously served on the committee, to serve, as appropriate, when a principal member is deemed to have a conflict of interest and the director of the technology transfer, or designee (w/o vote). The chair of the committee is chosen by the Committee on Committees. [rev. 7-06, 7-08, 5-12]

1640.57

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

[Removed 7-06, it was determined that a task force could be formed when needed.]

 

 

1640.58

UBUNTU

[Affirmative Action and Disability Affairs & Juntura were combined in 2012 to form Ubuntu]

A. CONTEXT: Ubuntu, as explained by Desmond Tutu, is essential to the interconnectedness of being human and living in interdependent communities. Ubuntu is affirming and inclusive of others because we all belong to a larger whole which is diminished when any members are humiliated, disrespected or oppressed.  People with Ubuntu enrich themselves but do so in ways that enable the community and all its members to also improve.   In this spirit the Ubuntu committee is established to advance these ideals.

B.  FUNCTION.

B-1.

3170 Biology

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Biology
    • General Biology Studies (no concentration)
    • Concentration in Neurobiology and Behavior
    • Concentration in Microbiology
    • Concentration in Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology
    • Concentration in Preprofessional Programs/Physiology
  • Minor in Biology

Department of Biology
Petit Science Center, Suite 495
404/413-5300
biology.gsu.edu

Phang C. Tai, Chair
Vincent Rehder, Associate Chair
Barbara Baumstark, Director of Instructional Programs
Therese Poole, Undergraduate Director
Jerria McCoy, Undergraduate Coordinator

Biology, the science of life and life processes, includes the study of structure, function, growth, development, reproduction, origin, evolution, and distribution of living organisms.

A degree in biology provides students with a variety of career opportunities. Potential careers range from applied or basic laboratory research and field studies in numerous state and federal organizations and industry, to education in public and private school systems. Furthermore, the degree provides the ideal preparation for entry into medical, dental, and veterinary schools and other health-related professions. Finally, a bachelor’s degree in biology provides a good foundation for advanced studies at the M.S. or Ph.D. level in biological sciences.

As an alternative to the General Biology Studies program (and in addition to the core degree requirements), courses in one of several areas of concentration, listed below, are available. Interdisciplinary programs with other departments/schools/institutes (such as Behavioral Biology or Environmental Science) are also an option. To plan the major according to the particular needs and goals, students should consult the “Undergraduate Program” area of the Biology Department Website (biology.gsu.edu) for information about the major. For advisement questions, students should contact the Undergraduate Coordinator (404/413-5305) who will help connect them with an appropriate faculty adviser.

Program Degree Requirements

Alternatives are available for some requirements in Areas A-F. Please see a degree program adviser for specific guidelines.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

B.S. in Biology

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum Recommendations

  1. Required course:
    • MATH 1113 Precalculus (or any higher-level mathematics course) (3)
  2. Recommended course:
  3. Laboratory Science Sequence (8)
    Recommended courses:
  4. Math. (3) Any one math not taken in area A from the following choices: Math 1070, 1220, 2201, 2202, 2211, 2212 (or any higher-level math). For any four credit-hour course, three credit hours are applied to Area D, and one credit hour is applied to area I.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Required Courses (16)
  2. Select one from the following (2):

** Students who decide to major in biology after completing BIOL 1103K may use BIOL 1103K for credit toward Area F if they complete BIOL 2108K and BIOL 2800 before enrolling in major courses (Area G)

*** Students who decide to major in biology after completing BIOL 1103K and BIOL 1104K may use these courses for credit toward Area F if they complete BIOL 2800 before enrolling in major courses (Area G).

Area G: Major Courses (39)

A grade of C or higher is required in all Area G, Area H, and Area I courses

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)
    • BIOL 3810 Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory-CTW  (3)
    • BIOL 4980 Senior Seminar-CTW  (3) or other 4000-level CTW-approved course
  2. Major Core Requirements (12)
  3. Choose one of the following labs: (1) *
    • BIOL 3250 Human Physiology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3830 Plant Biology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3850 Animal Biology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3890 Microbiology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3910 Genetics Laboratory (1)
    • * Students should consult with an adviser regarding the laboratory most appropriate to their course of study. Additional laboratories may be appropriate and the credit applied to item 4 below.
  4. At least one credit hour of BIOL 4960, Biology Careers Seminar (1), or BIOL 4970, Biology Seminar (1). It is recommended that students take BIOL 4960 early in their courses of study for career advisement.
  5. Additional biology courses at the 3000-4000 level and biology credit hours transferred from Area H (19).

Area H: Minor (13)

Students majoring in biology are required to complete the following:

  1. Required courses (13)

Area I: Additional Courses (8)

Select one two-course physics sequence (8) *

* Two semesters of physics are required for biology majors. If the physics sequence is used to fulfill the Area D requirement, then students should:

Select additional biology courses at the 3000 level or above OR courses from this list:

  • ANTH 4060 Environmental Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 4300 Human Evolution (3)
  • ANTH 4310 Human Variation (4)
  • ANTH 4350 Applied Biocultural Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 4370 Forensic Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 4390 Diet, Demography and Disease (3)
  • CHEM 3100 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2)
  • CHEM 3110 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2)
  • (CHEM 3100 and CHEM 3110 are required by most professional programs.)
  • CHEM 4110 Physical Chemistry I (3)
  • CHEM 4610 Biochemistry II (3)
  • CRJU 3410 Criminology (3)
  • CSC 2010 Introduction to Computer Science (3)
  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EDSC 3250 Topics in Middle Grades Science (3)
  • GEOL 4002 Oceanography (3)
  • GEOL 4011 Principles of Paleontology (4)
  • GEOL 4017 Environmental Geology (4)
  • GEOL 4644 Environmental Conservation (4)
  • GEOG 4642 Advanced Weather and Climate (4)
  • GEOG 4646 Water Resource Management (4)
  • SNHP 3000 Communication and Cultural Diversity (3)
  • HHS 3700 Medical-Biochemical Principles (3)
  • HHS 4400 Genetics Across Lifespan (3)
  • HHS 4500 Health Communication (3)
  • IT 3210 Teaching, Learning, and Technology Integration (3)
  • KH 3000 Personal Health and Wellness (3)
  • KH 3390 Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care (3)
  • KH 3610 Motor Learning and Development (4)
  • MATH 1070 Elementary Statistics (3)
  • MATH 2202 Calculus for the Life Sciences II (4)
  • MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4)
  • MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4)
  • MATH 2212 Calculus of One Variable II (4)
  • MATH 2215 Multivariate Calculus (4)
  • PHIL 4130 Philosophy of Science (3)
  • PHIL 4740 Biomedical Ethics (3)
  • PHYS 3500 Electronics (3)
  • PSYC 3010 Psychological Statistics (4)
  • PSYC 3140 Abnormal Psychology (3)
  • PT 3000 Introduction to PT and OT Practice (3)
  • PT 3660 Complementary and Alternative Therapy (3)
  • RT 3005 Clinical Cardiopulmonary Physiology (3)
  • Any other 3000- or 4000-level course in Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Psychology or Physics

Students majoring in biology must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

Neurobiology and Behavior Concentration

Recommended: Area F2

Recommended: Area G2

Required: Area G5

Recommended Area I:

Microbiology Concentration

Recommended: Area F2

Recommended: Area G2

Required: Area G5

  • All of the following courses are required (12):
  • Choose two of the following (8-9)
    • BIOL 4278 Immunology (4)
    • BIOL 4484 Laboratory Techniques in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (4)
    • BIOL 4580 Microbial Pathogenesis (4)
    • BIOL 4595 Microbial Physiology and Genetics (4)
    • BIOL 4696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4)
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (1-5), on a subject related to microbiology
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (3-4)
Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology Concentration

Recommended: Area F2

  • BIOL 2430 Frontiers in Biotechnology (2) or
  • BIOL 2800 Introduction to Molecular Biology (2)

Required: Area G5

  • All of the following courses are required (9)
    • BIOL 3910 Genetics Laboratory (1) — can be used to satisfy Area G2
    • BIOL 4564 Advanced Genetics (4)
    • BIOL 4800 Principles of Cell Biology (4)
  • Choose 14 hours (15 if Biol 3910 is used in G2) from the following:
Preprofessional/Physiology Concentration

Recommended: Area F2

Required: Area G5

  • All of the following courses are required (12 or 11 if Biol 3250 is used in G2)
    • Biol 3240] Human Physiology (3)
    • Biol 3250] Human Physiology Laboratory (1)
    • Biol 4240] Endocrinology (4)
    • Biol 4246] Advanced Human Physiology (4)
  • Choose three of the following (11-13)

Graduation with Distinction

At least five hours of Biol 4910 and a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher in the major and minor area are required for graduation with distinction.

Minor Offerings and Double Major in Biology

Students who wish to minor in biology must take at least 15 hours in courses in biology, including at least nine hours at the 3000 level or above. Students are responsible for meeting all prerequisite requirements (such as Chem 1211K/1212K) for the biology courses they choose to take, and are strongly encouraged to take these prerequisites as early as possible in their academic career. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in biology may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Students should consult with the Undergraduate Director or Undergraduate Coordinator for more information.

Honors Program

The department encourages qualified students to participate in the Honors Program (see “Honors Program” previously described or visit www.gsu.edu/~wwwhon/). The department sponsors a Biology Club, a Pre-Vet club, a Pre-Dental club and a local chapter of American Medical Student Association (AMSA) in addition to the Eta Psi chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the national honorary biological society. Interested students are encouraged to participate in these organizations.

Internships

Internships with collaborating institutions and programs (including ZooAtlanta, the Georgia Aquarium and the Bio-Bus program) are available on a limited basis. Students interested in receiving course credit for an internship should consult with the Undergraduate Director or Undergraduate Coordinator for more information.

Undergraduate Research Programs

Students are particularly encouraged to participate in the Undergraduate Research Program after completion of core requirements. Participation in an ongoing research activity provides the student with experience in experimental design and interpretation that is typically not available in routine laboratory courses. Students may enroll in BIOL 4905 for a total of 4 hours and/or BIOL 4910 for a total of 10 hours. Interested students should consult the departmental website for information on faculty research interests and contact one or more faculty members for development of a specific project.

One thought on “Foundation Biology 1640 Assignment No 1

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *