Essay Questions For The Wine Of Astonishment

Lovelace is consistently focused on the powerlessness of the black masses in the Caribbean and the consequent struggle they must go through to achieve dignity and peoplehood. In The Wine of Astonishment, the Spiritual Baptists are powerless against colonial law, which defines them as “illegal and illegitimate.” The result is that they cannot worship in the “true Baptist way.” They cannot ring their bell, burn their incense, and light their candles; nor do their ministers “have the authority to marry anybody.”

Refusing to exercise the power that rightfully belongs to them, the people in their collective impotence look upon the scholar, intellectual, and politician—in this case, Ivan Morton—to fight for them. In an obvious criticism of Caribbean political leadership, Lovelace depicts Morton as a man who alienates himself from his community and finally betrays that community as he promotes his self-interest.

The betrayal makes him one with the colonial overlord in the eyes of the village. He comes to the people only when he is seeking their votes, but once he is elected, he has no use for them. In time, the people come to see through these election gimmicks and begin to realize that “this sudden rush to answer applications for land, this sudden rush to put up crash programs to give a man a job for a week or two is just a trick for election.”

Lovelace suggests that it is only when the people realize that the power is with them, only when they look inward to themselves, will they be able to achieve their dignity as a people. Eva, clear-sighted woman that she is, reveals this notion to her husband when he seeks to lay the blame for their predicament on Ivan Morton: “For if we didn’t have the strength, if we didn’t have the power, if we wasn’t standing up on our own as a people, what was he there standing up for? We is a lot of people but we ain’t a people.” This is Lovelace’s way of criticizing the people of the Caribbean for placing too much emphasis on their political leaders and insufficient emphasis on themselves as a people.

Lovelace knows that the struggle for peoplehood demands sacrifice, for which the people must accept full responsibility. In the novel, Bolo embodies that sacrifice. He must die so that the people can survive. Very early in the novel, Eva observes that “the warrior was dying in the village as the chief figure.” The change in focus from warrior to scholar means that the people are ready to do...

(The entire section is 1023 words.)


Personal Narrative Paper

Paper Associated with Earl Lovelace's The Wine of Astonishment

Paper Associated with Jack Weatherford's Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas Transformed the World

Final For English ENGWR 100


Extra Credit


Grades

Homework (7431) [10:00-11:50]

Total Grade (7431) [10:00-11:50]


English Composition

Tim Kahl (916) 714-5401 (Please no calls after 9:30 PM) alias Victor Schnickelfritz and also Victor Schnickelfritz at The Great American Pinup

e-mail: tnklbnny@frontiernet.net or tnklbnny@mongryl.com

Rm #106 T/Th 10:00-11:50 [Yuba College Sutter Center]

Required Texts:

  • Lovelace, Earl. The Wine of Astonishment. Mariner Books, 1999

Highly Recommended: Internet Access.

Because being successful in today's job market requires men and women to have at least some working knowledge of computers, if at all possible, papers should be done using a word processor. Familiarizing yourself early with the word processor will save you much grief later on in your college career.

Course Objectives:

  • you will master a fluency of thought that demonstrates a natural continuity in your writing.
  • you will learn how to structure and coordinate your ideas on a global scale to produce an effective outcome.
  • you will begin to learn how to effectively research a topic you have chosen on your own and how to generate ideas, gather information and provide a balanced presentation about this topic.
  • you will learn how to use quotes accurately and effectively. you will concentrate your efforts in producing error-free, mechanically-correct prose.

Attendance Policy: There are 54 days we are scheduled to meet. Please be present for all of them. Any absence will greatly affect your ability to meet the requirements of the course. Absences and/or early departures in excess of 3 class periods may result in my dropping you from the course. Attendance will be noted and taken into consideration concerning borderline grades when the final grade is given.

Remember: You're paying for the time whether you come or not.

Electronic Submissions: You may choose to submit any and or all of your work via electronic submissions. You may submit:

  • work via the e-mail field. This works very well if you have a recent e-mail program (like the recent versions of Microsoft Outlook or Entourage) which support HTML. If you don't have one of these, some characters, such as quotation marks and apostrophes, will appear jumbled.
  • work as an attachment. Documents sent in Microsoft Word are preferable for attachments. If you send attachments in Microsoft Works or Word Perfect, I may not be able to open up your file, in which case, you will have to resend it. All work will be sent back to you via e-mail. It will use the following key in reference to the kind of comment that I will make on your paper.

Electronic submissions of papers and study questions are allowed (and actually encouraged). Submissions may be sent as Microsoft Word attachments or may be cut-and-pasted into the field of your e-mail application. My comments will come back with colored text on them, so you will need to have an e-mail program that will support colored text, such as Outlook, Outlook Express or Entourage (for Mac) and that is either rtf-based or html-based (preferable). If you are sending your e-mail from a website, such as hotmail, etc., then you will be able to receive colored text at that site.

All submissions should include your real name (along with your online handle if you like) and the type of assignment in the "To" or "Subject" box.

It is highly advisable to make a test e-mail for an important document if you are using electronic submissions for the first time and you are unsure of your ability to send the document.

Due Dates For Electronic Submissions: Must be dated and timed before class period in order to be exempt from the aforementioned 10% late penalty. [Some extensions may be given due to extenuating technical circumstances].

Revision Policy: One of the three out-of class papers may be turned in for revision. This paper must be below a 90 % to be eligible for revision. Due Dates: All assignments are due on the dates given (unless otherwise notified). Late assignments will be assessed a 10% penalty per late class session.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is pretending that someone else's ideas or writing is your own. Intentional failure to cite source material will be dealt with quickly and severely.

Behavior Expected In Class:

  • The golden rule is: try to be courteous of other people in the class at all times.
  • Please consider how your actions may be impacting others at all times.
  • No walkmans or headphones on in class If your cellular phone should ring or your beeper should go off, please remove yourself from the classroom and conduct your business outside the classroom.
  • Sleeping in class rather irritates me. Even though most of you probably work during the day (or at night), please try to refrain from sleeping in class.
  • Because so much of this class is geared towards discussion and participation, please try to come to class with pertinent items to discuss or comment on (i. e. try to generate some language with regard to the paper topics-that's why you're in the class).
  • Silently sitting in your chair and waiting to be taught is not acceptable.

Student Learning Outcome: students will demonstrate sriting skills by writing an organized thesis-controlled essay, using grammatically correct sentences. Additionally. students will demonstrate critical reading skills analyzing an essay in writing.

Grading Scale:

 87%Ð89% B+77%Ð79% C+67%Ð69% D+Below 60% F
92%Ð100% A83%Ð86% B74%Ð76% C63%Ð66% D 
90%Ð91% A-80%Ð83% B-70%Ð73% C-60%Ð62% D- 

 

 

 

Criterion For Grades On Written Assignments:

A work requires a compliance with the guidelines and the stated purpose of the assignment. Content is clear and balanced. There are no tangled sentences. A varied length of sentences is present and correct sentence structure is used. The pattern of development is clear and apparent and demonstrates forethought regarding the desired effect upon the reader. The styleand tone are appropriate to the topic and audience. There may be an occasional mistake in mechanics. The topic of the paper should aim to be fresh and original and should attempt to stretch the academic horizons of the writer.
B work requires a compliance with the guidelines and the stated purpose of the assignment. Content is generally clear and balanced, but there may be some instances in which there are some confusing or awkward sentences, though these do not detract from the overall effect of the paper. A somewhat limited variety of sentences may exist, but the sentence structure is generally correct. The pattern of development is apparent, but may deviate at times. The style and tone of the paper are generally appropriate to the topic and audience. There are relatively few mistakes in mechanics. The topic may not demonstrate any original thinking or particularly or novel approach to the assignment.
C work requires a fair amount of compliance with the guidelines and the stated purpose of the assignment, but may miss the stated objectives to some degree. Content is generally clear and balanced, but there may be several points where the sentence structure becomes jumbled and confused and this interferes with the flow of the paper. A limited variety of sentences is readily apparent. The pattern of development may be vague and unclear, but there is more than a semblance of formal constraint apparent. The style and tone may be somewhat varied and inappropriate for both the topic (misnomers) and the perceived audience. The topic does not demonstrate any novel approach to the given assignment. There are a distracting number of mistakes in mechanics.
D work demonstrates a minimal amount of compliance with the guidelines and the stated purpose of the assignment. Content is unclear and unbalanced and there may be a significant amount of jumbled and confused sentences. The pattern of development is unapparent and it demonstrates a lack of forethought on the part of the writer. The style and tone of the paper are wildly varied and inappropriate for both the topic and the perceived audience. The topic does not demonstrate any novel approach to the given assignment. There are an overwhelming number of mistakes in mechanics. In general, the paper demonstrates a hurried and haphazard approach devoid of any forethought (i.e. the paper that is written the night before).
F work demonstrates a minimal amount of compliance with the guidelines and the stated purpose of the assignment. Any work deemed to be completely unsatisfactory with regard to content, pattern of development, style, tone, topic, or mechanics. A paper in this category demonstrates an absolute minimum of effort.

Scoring

Personal Narrative Paper100
Comparison/Contrast Paper100
Paper on Earl Lovelace's Wine of Astonishment100
  
Subject A-like "in-class" Essay #150
Homework assignments/Quizzes135
  
Grammar Final50
Contingencies+/-

 


Schedule Of Events

Rm #106 T/Th 10:00-11:50 [Yuba College Sutter Center]

Note: This schedule reflects work that will be discussed in class on the date given. Students should be prepared to discuss the items listed for that day.

Week 1

Tues. Jan. 13Introductions and Syllabus
Thurs. Jan. 15Grammar Review Day

 

Week 2

Tues. Jan. 20

Personal Narrative Essay Guidelines.

Read Annie Dillard's "Transfiguration"

"How I Wrote the Moth Essay — And Why" by Annie Dillard

Thurs. Jan. 22

Read William Allen's "Zen and the Transcedent Art of Mowing Grass."

 

Week 3

Tues. Jan. 27Rough Draft for Personal Narrative Paper
Thurs. Jan. 29Rough Draft for Personal Narrative Paper

 

Week 4

Tues. Feb. 3

Final Draft for Personal Narrative Paper due

Read The Wine of Astonishment (pg. 1-50) Question Set #1 due

Discussion of Guidelines for The Wine of Astonishment Paper

Thurs. Feb. 5

Read The Wine of Astonishment (pg. 51-100) Question Set #2 due

 

Week 5

Tues. Feb. 10

Read The Wine of Astonishment (pg. 101-146) Question Set #3 due

Thurs. Feb. 12

Grammar Review Day

 

Week 6

Tues. Feb. 17

No Classes

Thurs. Feb. 19

Rough Draft For The Wine of Astonishment Paper

 

Week 7

Tues. Feb. 24

Rough Draft For The Wine of Astonishment Paper

Thurs. Feb. 26

Final Draft for The Wine of Astonishment Paper due

Read Indian Givers Chapter 1-3 (pg. 1-58)

Discuss Guidelines for Indian Givers Paper

 

Week 8

Tues. March 3

Read Indian Givers Chapter 1-3 (pg. 1-58)

Thurs. March 5

Read Indian Givers Chapter 4-5 (pg. 59-99)

 

Week 9

Tues. March 10

Read Indian Givers Chapter 6-8 (pg. 99-150)

Thurs. March 12

Read Indian Givers Chapter 9-10 (pg. 151-196)

 

Week 10

Tues. March 17

Read Indian Givers Chapter 11-14 (pg. 197-255)

Thurs. March 19

Rough Draft for Indian Givers

 

Week 11

Tues. March 24

Rough Draft for Indian Givers

Thurs. March 26

Final Draft for Indian Givers due

Grammar Review Day

 

Week 12

Tues. March 31

Spring Break

Thurs. April 1

Spring Break

 

Week 13

Tues. April 6

No Class

Thurs. April 8

[Last Day to Withdraw]

No Class

 

Week 14

Tues. April 13

Approach to in-class competency tests

Thurs. April 15

Rehearsal for in-class competency test #1

 

Week 15

Tues. April 20

In-class competency test #1

Thurs. April 22

Rehearsal for in-class competency test #2

 

Week 16

Tues. April 27

In-class competency test #2

Thurs. April 29Grammar Review Day

 

Week 17

Tues. May 5

Rehearsal for in-class competency test #3

Thurs. May 7In-class competency test #3

Week 18

Tues. May 12

Wrap-up day. Hand back all outstanding work.

(Finals Begin on May 14)

Final

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