University Of Michigan Honors Program Essay Prompts For Elementary

The University of Michigan School of Nursing seeks to create a class of academically excellent, culturally diverse students who show a genuine, demonstrated interest in contributing to the changing world of health care. See below to guide you through the application process.

Admission is for fall term only.

Request more information

Questions

Contact the Recruiting & Admissions team at UMSN-UndergradAdmissions@med.umich.edu or 734-763-5985.

U-M School of Nursing
426 N. Ingalls Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2003

Admission requirements

To be considered for the traditional BSN program, applicants are highly recommended to have completed the following credits: 

  • 4 units of English

  • 3 units of math (including second-year algebra and geometry)

  • 4 units of science (including 2 units of lab science, one of which is chemistry)

  • 2 units of social science

  • 2 units of foreign language

  • Additional math and science courses are encouraged 

Transfer credit policy for freshmen

If you have earned transfer credits during dual enrollment, enrollment in an early or middle college program, or through advanced placement or international baccalaureate testing, please review the School of Nursing Credit Policy for Freshmen to learn how your coursework or exam scores may be used to fulfill some credits in the Traditional BSN curriculum.

How can I make myself a competitive applicant?

The admissions committee will perform a holistic review of your application. The School of Nursing looks for students who show solid academic strength (particularly within the natural sciences), sustained extracurricular involvement, and a genuine, demonstrated interest in the field of nursing.

Educational background

  • Demonstrated strength and competency in the sciences, especially chemistry and biology;

  • Exposure to statistics. Statistics is part of the nursing curriculum at the sophomore level, but exposure to the subject during high school may be good preparation for our curriculum;

  • Psychology and sociology courses also help to round out a student's application.

Extracurricular activities

  • Job shadowing can help students determine their career aspirations and support a stated commitment to the field

  • Volunteering, especially if it provides exposure to the clinical environment, can be helpful to students as they explore their reasons for pursing a nursing degree

  • Experience in research can help prepare a student for the opportunity to participate in independent study research with faculty at the junior and/or senior level

  • Leadership is important, but note that we are more interested in learning what skills were acquired and how the skills were developed through leadership activity rather than merely the title or position held.

Personal qualities

  • Emotional intelligence: the ability to read people and situations is critical to becoming a successful nurse. Emotional intelligence also includes the ability to determine the appropriate behavior and communication in a clinical setting. 

  • Communication skills: A nurse must be able to understand a patient's perspective, ask the right questions in the right way when speaking with patients, and exercise effective non-verbal behavior when interacting with patients and their families. 

  • Initiative: The structure of our program requires that our nursing students demonstrate initiative on a regular basis. They must have the ability to synthesize information learning in class and apply it to clinical experience while continually asking questions as a part of their immersion learning process.

Application information

The Common Application is accessible online at www.commonapp.org.

 

Common Application instructions: 

  1. Add the University of Michigan to your list of colleges

  2. Select fall 2018 as term of choice

  3. Select the School of Nursing as your school of choice

A complete application for freshman admission must include:

  • U-M questions

  • The Common Application personal essay

  • School report

  • One academic teacher evaluation

  • Official high school transcript

    • Send transcript(s) directly to: Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 1220 Student Activities Building, 515 East Jefferson Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1316
  • Standardized test scores

    • All undergraduates must take either the SAT or the ACT.
    • Official test scores must be received by the University of Michigan before the application deadline. 
    • Send test scores to the University of Michigan directly from the testing agency using the exam codes
    • SAT code: 1839
    • ACT code: 2062
  • Application fee of $75 or fee waiver

Application deadlines

  • The Common Application will be available August 1, 2018
  • Early action deadline: November 1, 2018
  • Regular decision deadline: February 1, 2019

By selecting Honors under Special Offerings in the LSA Course Guide, students will find a fairly comprehensive list of Honors courses available for the term. Depending on course coding used by the department, you may find other courses throughout a search, but this is a great start in planning your schedule.

Here is a listing compiled for your scheduling:

AMCULT 240 – Introduction to Women’s Studies (HU, RE)  

Crosslisted with WOMENSTD 240.001

Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) 15 LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Ava Purkiss

A survey introduction to the critical, theoretical, and historical study of women and gender in America from a feminist perspective. Readings range across a wide body of feminist scholarship in order to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within the field. The course aims to sharpen critical awareness of how gender operates in institutional and cultural contexts, in students’ own lives and the lives of others. Two questions are central to the course: How is gender created and maintained through social practices (e.g., ideology or media representations)? How do these gendered social practices intersect with other social categories, such as race and ethnicity, social class and sexuality? Because Women’s Studies grew out of women’s activism, this course explores the relationship between the generation of knowledge about women and gender, and how to bring about gender equity in a society where race and ethnicity matter. Most of the course materials are drawn from the U.S. context; however, several weeks’ readings and lectures address feminist work in other parts of the world and transnationally.

ANTHRBIO 201 – Introduction to Biological Anthropology (NS)

Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 009 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Instructor:  John C. Mitani

What is the material basis of evolution? How have humans evolved? Why do humans behave in the manner that they do? This class seeks answers to these enduring questions. The course will be divided into three parts, emphasizing the processes that have shaped human evolution and how these have produced who we are.

ANTHRCUL 101 – Introduction to Anthropology (SS, RE)

Section: 001, 002 (LEC), Sec 006 (DIS), 038 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Thomas Chivens, Jason De Leon

This course introduces students to anthropology and its four subdisciplines (archaeological, biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a glimpse of the field's history, present status, and importance. We'll look at the concepts and methods that typify the discipline and frame anthropology's comprehensive, holistic worldview. The course looks especially at cultural and ethnic diversity, and the interactions leading to structures of dominance, inequality, and resistance. It teaches students ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. We'll cover topics like the nature of culture, race and ethnicity; human genetics, biological evolution, and the fossil record; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; the emergence of agriculture, cities, and states; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship, and family; sex-gender divisions; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; theories of development, power and social change; technoscience and emerging media; world systems, global assemblages, and contemporary cultural predicaments.

ANTHRCUL 258 – Honors Seminar in Anthropology

Section: 001 Culture and Medicine

Instructor:  Holly Peters-Golden

In this seminar, we will examine the ways in which health and illness are both constructed out of, and interpreted within, cultural settings. Focusing on Western biomedicine, we will discuss a broad range of illness experiences - from schizophrenia to cancer, post-traumatic stress disorder to asthma, Tourette's to Alzheimer's, among others - to address a number of questions currently central to medical anthropology. Topics may include (but will not be limited to) the meaning and alteration of self and personhood in illness; the ways in which medical knowledge is produced and imagined, the culture of science and technology, immunity and risk, illness narrative, and social and historical views of the body.

ASTRO 101, 102, 115

Option for an Honors Structured Study Group (SSG) for Honors credit exists. See instructor.

BIOLOGY 171 – Introductory Biology:  Ecology and Evolution (NS)

Section: 002, 004 (LEC), Sec 200, 201 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Josephine Kurdziel

BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term course in ecology and evolutionary biology that, together with BIOLOGY 172 and 173, collectively form the introductory biology course unit.

The primary aims of BIOLOGY 171 are:

1.     to provide factual and conceptual knowledge concerning the origin and complex interactions of the Earth's biodiversity

2.     to give an integrated overview of biological organization including genes, individuals, kin groups, populations, species, communities, and ecosystems

3.     to engage with biological hypotheses dealing with prominent current issues such as human evolutionary origins, emerging diseases, conservation biology and global change

4.     to develop critical-thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 171 are divided among three primary areas:

  • Mendelian genetics and evolutionary processes
  • Biodiversity, organismal biology
  • Ecology

BIOLOGY 172 – Introductory Biology – Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental (NS)

Section: 002, 004 (LEC), Sec 200, 201 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Steven Clark, Lyle Simmons

BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that, together with BIOLOGY 171 and 173, collectively forms the introductory biology course sequence.

The aims of BIOLOGY 172 are:

  • to provide factual and conceptual knowledge of how cells, organs, and organisms work; and
  • to develop scientific hypothesis-testing and critical-thinking skills.

CHEM 215 – Structure and Reactivity II (NS) 

Section: 200 (LEC), Sec 220, 230, 250, 270 (DIS) LSA HNRS            

Instructor:  Alexander Poniatowski

Students get further practice in applying the major concepts of chemistry to predicting the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, including macromolecules, both synthetic and biological.

ECON 101 – Principles of Economics I (QR/2)

Section: 100 (LEC), Sec 104 (DIS)LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Adam Stevenson

This course introduces fundamental microeconomic concepts and analysis. This includes supply and demand; theories of the firm and consumer choice; and competition, monopoly, and imperfect competition. Throughout the semester, the course will stress applications of elementary economic theory to real world issues and problems. We will address a number of policy questions including environmental regulation, price regulation, and re-distributive spending and taxation.

ECON 102 – Principles of Economics II (QR/2)

Section: 200 (LEC), Sec 203 (DIS)LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Maciej Dudek

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest.

Major topics include

  • the determinants of aggregate output,
  • employment and unemployment,
  • inflation,
  • the balance of international trade, and
  • economic growth.

ENGLISH 140 – First Year Seminar on English Language and Literature (HU)

Section: 003 Forms of Desire:  British Romantic Poetry LSA HNRS Y1

Instructor:  Marjorie Levinson

The sonnet entered English poetry with the Renaissance and is still going strong today. We open this study of the short poem in English — lyric poetry, on one definition — by comparing sonnet practice from different periods and then widening the field to include other lyric kinds, sampling different movements and voices in British and American poetry. The emphasis is on critical reading skills, the cultivation of which is the central aim of this course. Many of these skills are transferable to the reading of novels, plays, the lyrics of popular music, and prose non-fiction (literary, political, and the like).

Although poetry, like prose, operates in a linear fashion (it makes an argument, tells a story, explores an idea), it ALSO calls attention to its sound, imagery, appearance on the page, etymology, symbolic and rhetorical codes, allusions, and so forth. Often, this patterning interferes, or even seems to work at cross-purposes with, the forward thrust of the narrative or logical set-up. Figuring out the story or logical structure arising from this tension between an object oriented language (a language about objects and a language having an objective or “point”) and an object-like language (a language aspiring to the sensuous richness of object life in its own right) is the great reward of poetry. It teaches us a kind of thinking that can chime with thought-styles at once very old, or “pre-modern,” and very new, or “post-modern.”

INTLSTD 101 – Introduction to International Studies (SS)

Cross Listed with GEOG 145 Sections 001, 003

Section: 001 (LEC), 003 (DIS) LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Greta L. Uehling

This is the introductory core course for the International Studies major at the University of Michigan. The course explores human rights, human development and human security in historical and comparative perspective using multiple disciplinary approaches. The curriculum is divided into six modules that cover:

  • globalization;
  • international relations and organizations;
  • human rights and humanitarianism;
  • global environment and health;
  • human development; and
  • culture and identity.

Honors:
Students in the Honors section of INTLSTD 101 will have discussions with the primary instructor for the course. These discussions will address special topics that build on material covered in lecture, and enable the students to explore key topics of international significance in more depth.

LATIN 231 – Roman Kings and Emperors

Section: 001, 002

Instructor:  Deborah Pennell Ross

Great Romans in Latin prose and poetry is an intensive Honors section which covers the LATIN 231 material in half semester and includes an introduction to Vergil's Aeneid in its second half. Students who have completed successfully the Honors section can start accumulating credit towards a concentration/minor in a Classics-related field by enrolling into a 300-level LATIN course or higher for the last term of their language requirement.

MATH 176 – Explorations in Calculus (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 001 Explorations in Topology and Analysis

Instructor:  Evangelia Gazaki

This course is an Inquiry-Based version of Honors Calculus I and II (such as Math 185/186) and provides the necessary preparation for Multivariable Calculus (Math 215 or the honors version, Math 285). A student who has had some exposure to calculus (e.g., AB or BC in high school, or Math 115) will be well-prepared for this course. The majority of class time will be spent working in groups and presenting ideas and solutions to problems.

MATH 186 – Honors Calculus II (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 001

Instructor:  Evangelos Dimou

Most students take calculus in high school, and it may seem that there isn't much new to learn. The goal of this course is to develop the familiar concepts of calculus using a more rigorous and theoretical approach. In particular, with its emphasis on how to use appropriate mathematical language, this course lays a solid foundation for future math courses, and is suitable for students intending to pursue a major in mathematics, science, or engineering who desire a more complete understanding of the underpinnings of calculus. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program. This course is a continuation of Math 185.

MATH 285 – Honors Multivariable and Vector Calculus (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 002

Instructor:  Alejandro Uribe-Ahumada

The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

PHYSICS 160 – Honors Physics I (NS, QR/1)

Section: 001

Instructor:  Greg van Anders

PHYSICS 160 covers the fundamental principles of mechanics using a modern perspective. It emphasizes the applicability of these laws in systems ranging from binary stars to nuclear collisions. This class will be different, and more interesting, than any physics course you have taken yet.

The goals of the course are:

1.     Application of fundamental principles to a wide range of systems, i.e., from nuclei to stars (unify mechanics)

2.     Integrate contemporary physics (atomic models of matter, relativistic dynamics)

3.     Engage students in physical modeling (idealization, approximation, assumptions, estimation)

4.     Integrate computational physics (now a partner of theory and experiment) into problem solving

PHYSICS 161 – Honors Introductory Mechanics Lab (NS)

Section: 001

Instructor:  Jianming Qian

PHYSICS 161 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 160.

This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms.

PHYSICS 260 – Honors Physics II (NS, QR/1)

Section: 001

Instructor:  Jeffrey John McMahon

PHYSICS 260 is a continuation of PHYSICS 160 and introduces the theory of electromagnetic phenomena. This course will introduce you to:

1.     The deeper physical meaning of the concepts

2.     A rigorous mathematical approach, using vector calculus when applicable

3.     Problem solving including computer use

4.     Contemporary applications

If you like physics and math, appreciate the deeper meaning and derivation of concepts and equations, and if you like to do problems, you are in the right course.

PHYSICS 261 – Honors Electricity and Magnetism Lab (NS)

Section: 001, 002

Instructor:  Andrew D. Tomasch

PHYSICS 261 is a three-hour weekly laboratory designed to accompany PHYSICS 260. This lab introduces students to the core concepts of physics, namely careful observations, both quantitative and qualitative, followed by comparison with appropriate mathematical models that serve as the basis for descriptive interpretation. Course material is focused on developing a good understanding of the concepts and principles of Newtonian mechanics while providing sophisticated experiments for demonstrating the validity of these fundamental paradigms. The analytical techniques require high school level algebra and some familiarity with statistical measures of significance, procedures common to any scientific, technical, or medical area of inquiry. Although not an academic requirement, it is assumed that the students will have some basic skills in using a computer at the level of a word processing program or similar application task.

PSYCH 120 – First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social science (SS)

Section: 004 What Makes Life Worth Living?  9 LSA Hnrs Y1

Instructor:  Nansook Park

This first-year seminar addresses the topic of what makes life worth living. This course will draw on positive psychology as well as allied work in various disciplines to address these common themes of the good life. In this seminar course, students will learn about the science and art of life worth living by examining research findings as well as specific practices that build and promote happy, healthy and meaningful life.

STATS 280 – Honors Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (MSA, QR/1)

Section: 001

STATS 280 will provide in-depth discussion of models and methods that are appropriate to specific situations, criteria for selecting among them, their strengths and weaknesses and their conceptual footing. Interactive learning will be emphasized in lectures and the laboratory module. During the lab, students will learn to use modern statistical software for visualization and data analysis, and carry out the computational parts of lab assignments.

STATS 280 includes derivations of basic statistical results such as expected values and sampling variances using techniques from pre-calculus mathematics. Students will also be expected to master quantitative relationships such as scaling relationships between variances, sample sizes, and standard errors

Definition and summary of univariate and bivariate data, distributions, correlation, and associated visualization techniques; randomization in comparative studies and in survey sampling; basic probability calculus, including conditional probabilities, concept of random variables and their properties; sampling distributions and the central limit theorem; statistical inference, including hypothesis tests, confidence intervals; one sample and two sample problems with binary and continuous data, including nonparametric procedures; analysis of variance; simple and bivariate regression; simple design of experiments; chisquare and rank-based tests for association and independence.

WOMENSTD 240– Introduction to Women’s Studies (HU, RE) 

Crosslisted with AmCult 240.001

Section: 001 (LEC), Sec 012 (DIS) 14 LSA HNRS

Instructor:  Ava Purkiss

A survey introduction to the critical, theoretical, and historical study of women and gender in America from a feminist perspective. Readings range across a wide body of feminist scholarship in order to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within the field. The course aims to sharpen critical awareness of how gender operates in institutional and cultural contexts, in students’ own lives and the lives of others. Two questions are central to the course: How is gender created and maintained through social practices (e.g., ideology or media representations)? How do these gendered social practices intersect with other social categories, such as race and ethnicity, social class and sexuality? Because Women’s Studies grew out of women’s activism, this course explores the relationship between the generation of knowledge about women and gender, and how to bring about gender equity in a society where race and ethnicity matter. Most of the course materials are drawn from the U.S. context; however, several weeks’ readings and lectures address feminist work in other parts of the world and transnationally.

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